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$39.99
  • MUSEUM QUALITY INKS AND PAPER: Printed on thick 192gsm heavyweight matte paper with archival giclee inks, this historic fine art will decorate your wall for years to come.
  • VINTAGE MAP REPRODUCTION: Add style to any room\'s decor with this beautiful print. Whether your interior design is modern or classic, a map is never out of fashion.
  • FRAME READY: Your unframed poster will arrive crease-free, rolled in a sturdy mailing tube. Many maps fit easy-to-find standard size frames 16x20, 16x24, 18x24, 24x30, 24x36, saving on custom framing.
  • ATTENTION TO DETAIL: We edit every antique map for image quality, color and vibrance, so it can look its best while retaining historical character. Makes a great gift!
  • Watermarks will not appear in the printed picture. Some blemishes, tears, or stamps may be removed from the final print.
A spectacular 1871 view of Manhattan issued in the May 6th supplement edition of Harper's Weekly Magazine. To quote from the document itself: In studying this pictorial map the spectator is supposed to be stationed somewhere in mid air above Fort Hamilton, at the outlet of the [Verrazano] Narrows, from which convenient height he can cast his eye of all the century lying with a radius of eighteen miles of New York. In the center he will see the great metropolis, with its busy marts and wharves, its splendid Park (Central Park) and the surrounding islands. On the right, the city of Brooklyn, and the town lying eastward as far as Jamaica and Hempstead, and northward as far as New Rochelle, with the railroads that make them suburbs of New York, and the islands and headlands of the Sound. On the left he will see Staten Island, with its picturesque villas, Jersey City, Newark, and all the pleasant suburban villages and towns of New Jersey as far south as Perth Amboy, westward to West Orange, and northward to Caldwell and Paterson. Following the course of the Hudson, he will see all the towns and places of interest on the banks between New York and Yonkers, which can be reached either by railroad or by the various lines of steamboats that, during the spring, summer and autumn month, enliven the surface of that river. The surrounding cities and villages on each side in reality belong to New York, with which they are connected by means of transit so rapid that the merchant or broker doing business in the lower part of the town can rich his house in Orange, Elizabeth, College Point, Jamaica, or Hempstead in less time that the street cars or stages would take him to the region of Central Park. The completion of the Brooklyn Bridge will make the transit still more rapid and convenient on that side of the town, and at some future day a tunnel under the Hudson may do the same for the other.
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