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$39.99
  • MUSEUM QUALITY INKS AND PAPER: Printed on thick 192gsm heavyweight matte paper with archival giclee inks, this historic fine art will decorate your wall for years to come.
  • VINTAGE MAP REPRODUCTION: Add style to any room\'s decor with this beautiful print. Whether your interior design is modern or classic, a map is never out of fashion.
  • FRAME READY: Your unframed poster will arrive crease-free, rolled in a sturdy mailing tube. Many maps fit easy-to-find standard size frames 16x20, 16x24, 18x24, 24x30, 24x36, saving on custom framing.
  • ATTENTION TO DETAIL: We edit every antique map for image quality, color and vibrance, so it can look its best while retaining historical character. Makes a great gift!
  • Watermarks will not appear in the printed picture. Some blemishes, tears, or stamps may be removed from the final print.
This is an example of David H. Burr's 1831 first edition map of Holland (the Netherlands), Belgium and Luin xemburg. It covers from the North Sea to Luin xembourg. Towns, rivers, mountains, canals and various other important topographical details are noted. Elevation throughout is rendered by hachure and political and regional territories are color coded. Just a year before the publication of this map, the 1830 Belgian Revolution would create the modern Belgian state. Luin xembourg would be considered a province of the new Belgian state. The Netherlands however, would refuse to recognize the new country of Belgium until the 1839 Treaty of London. This Treaty would also grant Luin xembourg the status of Grand Duchy, while its western portion would be ceded to Belgium as a province. In 1842, the Grand Duchy of Luin xembourg would become part of the German Customs Union. According to Ristow, although Burr is credited on the title page, he left this atlas incomplete. He was appointed as topographer to the U.S. Post Office, and of the siin xty-three maps finally included in this atlas, only completed eight. The rest of the maps were then completed by Illman and Pilbrow in Burr's style. This map was ‘Entered according to act of Congress in the year 1831 by David H. Burr in the Clerk's office of the District Court for the Southern District of New York', but was not published until the atlas was released in 1835. Published by D. S. Stone in Burr's New Universal Atlas.
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